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Physical Therapy: Web Resources

Resources for physical therapy students.

Searching the Web for Physical Therapy Sources

There is a wealth of valuable information related to Physical Therapy that is freely available on the web. Just remember that information you find on the web needs to be evaluated carefully.

Suggested Websites

How to Evaluate Web Resources

1. Currency:

  • When was the website last updated?
  • Is the information out of date? Is there more recent information about the topic that is available?
  • Do the links appear to be working? And, are they related to the topic/s of the website?

2. Relevancy:

  • What is the purpose of the information source? Is the information source intended to inform, advocate, sell, slander, etc? Is it ironic (a satire or a parody)? How can you tell what its purpose is?
  • How well does the information source relate to your topic? Does it only address one part of your topic, or is it more broadly related? Do you need additional information sources to address different parts of your topic?

3. Authority:

  • What person or group is responsible for the information in your source?
  • Can you find contact information for that person or group?
  • Is the author or organization a qualified source, or an expert in their field? What credentials and/or affiliations listed on the source show evidence of authority?
  • What type of domain name does the website have (.com, .org., .edu, .gov, .net)? Or, does it have some other domain?

4. Objectivity/Bias:

  • Who is the intended audience for the information source (student, professional, general etc.)? What helped you decide who the intended audience is?
  • Does the information source have a bias? If so, describe the position taken on the issue.
  • If is appears the information source has a bias, what is an example of the loaded language that helps you recognize it?
  • Are the statements, opinions, and/or statistics given in the information source supported with references?

Need help or more information?

Megan Mamolen        Contact:

        Megan Mamolen, PhD, MLIS

          Librarian, Assistant Professor

          Phone: 440-525-7310

          Email: mmamolen1@lakelandcc.edu

          Office: LibraryC-3051c

Lakeland Community College Library | 7700 Clocktower Dr. Kirtland, OH, 44094 | 440-525-7425 | myLakeland